News & Events

  • Doug Haynes traveled in June to the University of Goetingen, where he delivered a keynote lecture for a conference devoted to “Informal and Everyday Markets—Histories of Business and Entrepreneurship in India Since the Nineteenth Century.”   In March, Haynes, who is a specialist in South Asian history, delivered a co-written plenary address at...

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  • Historian David Brion Davis ’50, whose career has focused on exploring the problem of slavery in the development of the modern world, will be awarded the 2013 National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in a White House ceremony on Monday, July 28, “for reshaping our understanding of history.”

    The first in his family to attend college, Davis came to Dartmouth on the GI Bill after serving in World War II. In announcing the honor, The National Endowment for the Humanities wrote...

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  • List of Honors Theses for the Class of 2014:

    John Descalzi, “Asserting Autonomy: The Role of Tanaka Kakuei in Japanese Policymaking, 1969-1974” (Advisor: Ericson)

    Maria Fernandez, “Cultural Politics and Marxist Aesthetics in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1965” (Advisor: Goldthree)

    George Helding, “’Curing the Ills of Democracy’: Party Reform and the Emergence of the Modern Democratic Party After the Fall of...

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  • At This Point in History is a collaborative blog effort by members of Dartmouth’s history department, who post their contributions in their own name.  Topics range from A Lesson in Writing Acknowledgements to book reviews, and setting the record straight...

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  • Edward Miller, an associate professor of history, says most American histories of the Vietnam War omit a crucial element, the Vietnamese themselves, the Valley News writes.

    “The Vietnam War was a hugely important event in U.S. history, but it has been written about and studied overwhelmingly from the American side. I’m trying to reframe that debate,” says Miller, whose new book is Misalliance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and the Fate...

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  • Growing up in South Korea, Jun Bum Sun ’14 had heard of an American activist who’d advocated for Korean independence. But it wasn’t until he arrived in Hanover that he felt a connection to the man known as “Korea’s favorite American.”

    “I’d read about him in history textbooks,” he says. “But I had no idea he was a Dartmouth alumnus.”

    The activist was Homer Hulbert of the Class of 1884. After arriving on campus, Jun learned that Hulbert went to Dartmouth.

    “It was...

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  • The history department will host “Military Service and National Obligation: A Symposium,” featuring lectures and a roundtable discussion about the history of armed service, on October 5 and 6.

    The symposium will explore themes from President Emeritus James Wright’s most recent book, Those Who Have Borne the Battle: A History of America’s Wars and Those Who Fought Them (PublicAffairs, a member of Perseus Books 2012). Dartmouth faculty members from the history,...

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