Prizes

History honors theses and course paper submissions for prizes are made by the faculty of the History Department.

Charles Downer Hazen Fellowship

Is awarded annually to the major who has achieved the highest grade point average in History at the end of their junior year.

The 2019 recipient: Walker Schneider '19
The 2020 recipient: David Velona '21
The 2021 recipient: Garrick Allison '22

Morton Prizes

Louis Morton Memorial Prize in American History: Awarded annually to the student who has written the best essay dealing with United States history for courses offered by faculty of the History Department.

The 2022 recipient: Ndalaku Okolo '22, "The Legacy of the Feminist Wave Metaphor" written for Professor Julia Rabig in HIST 96.38.

Louis Morton Memorial Prize in Asian, African or Latin American History: Awarded annually to the student who has written the best essay dealing with Asian, African or Latin American history for courses offered by faculty of the History Department.

The 2022 recipient: John Cho '22, "No Longer Voting with their Feet: The Changing Agricultural Practices of the Hmong People in Southeast Asia" written for Professor Douglas Haynes in HIST 75/ENVS 45.

Louis Morton Memorial Prize in European History: Awarded annually to the student who has written the best essay dealing with European history for courses offered by faculty of the History Department.

The 2022 recipient: Billy Hobbs '22, "Brews to News: The Transformation of the Coffee House in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century London" written for Professor Carl Estabrook in HIST 96.03.

Louis Morton Memorial Prize in Interregional or Comparative History: Awarded annually to the student who has written the best essay dealing with a topic of interregional or comparative history for courses offered by faculty of the History Department.

The 2022 recipient: Eric Lee '23, "'Popery and Slavery': How Anti-Catholicism Eroded the Legitimacy of British Governing Institutions Throughout the Empire, 1774-1776" written for Professor Carl Estabrook in HIST 96.03.

Patten London Research Prize

Awarded annually by the Department of History to a member of the History Foreign Study Program in London who has written the best independent research paper.

The 2022 recipient: Sarah Engelman '23, "Conscience and Citizenship: British Conscientious Objection During World War I".

John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding

Chase Peace Prize

The Chase Peace Prize was established at Dartmouth College by Edward M. Chase, a native of Lithuania who emigrated to the United States, settling in Manchester, New Hampshire, until his death, in 1939. A philanthropist of many causes, Mr. Chase established the Peace Prize in order to encourage careful reflection on the causes of war and the prospects for peace in the world. The Chase Peace Prize is awarded to the best senior thesis or culminating project that treats the subject of war, conflict resolution, the prospects and problems of maintaining peace, or other related topics.

Recent History majors who have won this distinguished prize:

Ethan Klaris '20, "To Punish Them and Make Them Very Poor: Morality and Total War on the Southern Plains, 1868-1875"

Yoo Jin Chae '18, "'May This Tribunal Prevent the Crime of Silence': The Russell Tribunal on War Crimes in Vietnam, 1967"

Carson Hele '16, "The Family-Friendly Occupation: Military Dependents and American Power in Postwar Japan, 1945-1952"

Blaze Joel '15, "One People. One Nation. Two Wars: Nationalism and Memory in Croatia and the Breakup of Yugoslavia"

Louis Wheatley '14, "Matriotism: American Motherhood in Protest Against WWII, the Vietnam War, and the Iraq War"

History Honors Thesis Prizes

Salvador Allende Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis dealing with Latin American or western hemispheric history.

This prize was not awarded in 2022.

The 2021 recipient: Maryfer Mendoza '21, "Tijuana La Zona Norte, An In-Between Zone: The Evolution of Vice-Industry and Policy on the U.S.-Mexico Border," advised by Professor Annelise Orleck.

Class of 1859 Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis upon an historical subject dealing with European studies.

The 2022 recipient: Benjamin Citow '22, "To Flee, or Not to Flee: Refugees and Religious Mobility in Early Modern Tuscany," advised by Professor Diego Pirillo.

Jones History Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis upon some subject connected with the history of the United States.

The 2022 recipient: Londyn Crenshaw '22, "Growing Gardens of Resistance: An Intergenerational and Transregional Exploration of the Struggle, Skill, and Resistance of Black Southern Farmworkers from the Antebellum Period to the Early 21st Century," advised by Professor Annelise Orleck.

Richard B. McCornack Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis in Latin American history.

This prize was not awarded in 2022.

The 2021 recipient:  Fionnuala Murphy '21, "Un Sueno Para Vender: The Economics of Memory and The Malvinas War in Argentinian Political Discourse, 1989-2015," advised by Professor Melendez-Badillo.

Peter J. Reichard 1966 Memorial Research Award

Awarded annually for the best thesis written by a student enrolled in the History Department's Honors Program.

The 2022 recipient: Maya Khanna '22, "Reimagining Pristine Wilderness: Examining 175 Years of Genocide in America's National Parks (1848-Present)," advised by Professor Annelise Orleck.

Jonathan B. Rintels Prize

This prize is awarded annually in the fall for the best honors thesis in the Social Sciences.

The 2020 recipient: Courtney Stump '20, ""For the Public Good": Women's Political Engagement in Revolutionary-era Boston," advised by Professor Paul Musselwhite.

Steven S. Rosenthal '71 Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis in non-western history.

This prize was not awarded in 2022.

The 2021 recipient: Womsikuk James '21, "The Shiv Sena: The History of a Political Movement and its Transitional Phases," advised by Professor Douglas Haynes.

Charles T. Wood Prize

Awarded annually to a member of the History Department's Honors Program who, in the judgment of the Department, submits the best thesis dealing with a topic of interregional or comparative history.

The 2022 recipient: Mary Winters '22, "'These Religious Art Poems of France': The Creation of the Cloisters Museum and Medieval Memory Making in Early 20th Century America," advised by Professor Cecilia Gaposchkin.