SLAVERY'S METROPOLIS, a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Read more about SLAVERY'S METROPOLIS, a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize Professor Rashauna Johnson's new book Slavery's Metropolis (Cambridge, 2016) has been named a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, one of the most coveted awards for the study of the African American experience.

PREVIEW SHOWING OF KEN BURN'S "THE VIETNAM WAR"

Read more about PREVIEW SHOWING OF KEN BURN'S "THE VIETNAM WAR" Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick are coming to the Hopkins Center for the Arts on July 13th, 7pm, Spaulding Auditorium, to present an evevning of highlights from their forthcoming PBS series "The Vietnam War." followed by a discussion of

VOEKEL'S WORK ON UNDOCUMENTED EDUCATION RECOGNIZED

Read more about VOEKEL'S WORK ON UNDOCUMENTED EDUCATION RECOGNIZED In a New Yorker article, "An Underground College for Undocumented Immigrants refused admission by public universities and unable to get funding from

NAVARRO AWARDED LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Read more about NAVARRO AWARDED LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Professor Emerita Marysa Navarro has been awarded the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) lifetime achievement award at the International Congress in Lima, Peru, on April 30, 2017. Story.

THE BABY BOOMER WAR

Read more about THE BABY BOOMER WAR James Wright, a historian and a president emeritus of Dartmouth College, is the author of Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War. He was an enlisted Marine before the Vietnam War. New York Times Op-Ed by President Emeritus James Wright. Read full Opinion here.

JOHNSON'S SLAVERY'S METROPOLIS WINS PRIZE

Read more about JOHNSON'S SLAVERY'S METROPOLIS WINS PRIZE The Louisiana Historical Association's F. Kemper and Leila Williams Prize Committee has selected Slavery's Metropolis as its 2016 winner.

Sackeyfio-Lenoch is named ACLS Fellow

Read more about Sackeyfio-Lenoch is named ACLS Fellow Professor Naaborko Sackeyfio Lenoch has been awarded a  Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars from the American Council of Learned Societies. Read full story.

The History Department Condemns the US Executive Order

Both democracy and good scholarship depend on the free exchange of ideas and information across national borders. The Executive Order's establishment of national and religious criteria for participation in scholarly exchanges threatens our academic mission, and is based on indefensibly broad extensions of national security mandates. Barring foreign students and researchers from the United States not only deprives American institutions of the opportunity to lead in our fields but also raises the specter of reciprocal restrictions limiting the mobility and research access of American scholars.

Such policies are immoral and have historically worked against their stated goal of protecting national security. Again and again, closing doors to refugees and migrants has impaired international exchange and cooperation, raising enmity and the prospect of conflict. Opening doors to those previously excluded, by contrast, has promoted prosperity and enriched cultures. As professionals, we must warn against the privileging of fear and false causalities evident in the Executive Order.

Moving forward, we commit to supporting foreign scholars and students and mitigating the Executive Order's detrimental effects on scholarship. We stand in solidarity with the more than 3,000 academics from around the world who have called for a boycott of international academic conferences held in the United States until the ban is repealed. The boycott clearly shows how the ban is already having a chilling effect on our ability as scholars to meet and collaborate with colleagues from other nations. We call on Dartmouth College to use its legal and financial resources to defend jeopardized students and staff who are not U.S. citizens and to create opportunities for as-yet-unaffiliated non-U.S. scholars who risk being cut off by the Executive Order. We call on the Trump administration to rescind the order and to work to repair the damage it has already caused to America's standing in the world.

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